Toronto to revamp long term care homes!

Blog Dec 11

The city of Toronto is planning to revamp their long term care homes! Their plan will include the implementation of an “emotion focused care model”. All staff will receive in-depth training on this model which focuses on empathy, creating friendships and engagement of activities that give life purpose.

The city of Toronto examined innovative models of care such as: the Butterfly model, the Green House Project, and the Eden Alternative and decided to use a Toronto-created approach.

“The proposal calls for extra staff members, beginning with six new front line workers in a 2020 pilot project at Lakeshore Lodge in Etobicoke. Starting in 2021, roughly 55 additional workers would be hired each year until 2025, when a total of 281 new staff members would be in place throughout the city’s 10 facilities.” An evaluation component, conducted by the University of Toronto, will be built into the pilot project at Lakeshore Lodge. Read more here.

Way to go Toronto! Let’s hope other cities will follow suit.

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My husband said “please don’t put me in a home”

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Taking the time to care

In 2011 Brian was diagnosed with dementia.  Last summer he died after being in long-term care (LTC) for 4 1/2 years.  I tried my hardest to care for him at home but Lewy Body Dementia defeated us.

I will always feel guilty: nearly 20 years ago I retired from my working life as a therapist which included visiting residents in LTC. I knew how unhappy he would be there.

I was right. Little had changed in the quality of life of the residents: the way staff worked was still hierarchical, the medical model firmly in place.  Care plans barely took into account the life experience, interests and personality of the resident.  Front line staff did their very best but were dominated and constrained by “Ministry” regulations.

The time is rapidly approaching when I and thousands of “baby boomers” may need a place in LTC.

Culture change is needed now and is possible through putting each resident’s emotional and social needs at the core of their care.  Change: to make living spaces home like and comfortable; time filled with companionship and meaningful activity, change to give staff the time and satisfaction of taking care of a resident known for who they were and are now.

Should I need a place in LTC I don’t want to be in a home where I am kept alive: I want to be helped to live.

Submitted by Janet

 

 

 

 

Renfrew County follows the lead from Peel’s Malton Village

Two years after we featured several blog posts on the Butterfly home initiative at Malton Village in the Peel Region, there are now some very exciting results:

  • A 75% decrease in staff sick time resulting in continuity of care and huge cost savings;
  • a decrease from 39%-10% of residents exhibiting symptoms of depression;
  • a decrease in antipsychotic use by those without a diagnosis of psychosis 40% (‘17) to 8% (‘19);
  • anticipation that the implementation will end up being cost neutral after 3 years.

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Merrilee Fullerton, Minister of Long-term Care, meets with resident in Renfrew County.

And now on October 9th, 2019, both Bonnechere Manor and Miramichi Lodge Long-term Care Homes in Renfrew County began a journey to turn a dementia unit into a Butterfly Home.  “The transition will include significant environmental changes such as smaller more home-like ‘neighbourhoods’ versus units. This would mean for example converting a dementia unit where currently 20 residents reside into two (2) smaller neighbourhoods of 10.  Other environmental changes will include redesigning the dementia units to be more welcoming and intimate, and filling the household with the ‘stuff of life’ so that residents can connect with a variety of colours, textures and objects that reflect their past lives, work and hobbies.”  For full media release, click here.

Way to go Renfrew County for being another champion for culture change!

Contact your MPPs and City Councilors to let them know about these new developments and that we need to invest in more innovation in our long-term care homes.  Let’s keep the momentum going!

 

Tell your candidates that Canada needs a fully funded Dementia Strategy

On June 17, 2019, the Government of Canada released the country’s first-ever national dementia strategy: A Dementia Strategy for Canada: Together We Aspire

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Status quo
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  Relationship-based model of care

A fully-funded strategy will allow Canada to meet the challenges of dementia with a coordinated, focused approach to care and research. The strategy will address the overwhelming scale, impact and cost of dementia in Canada through three key objectives:

• Prevent dementia,
• Advance therapies and find a cure, and
• Improve the quality of life of people living with dementia and caregivers.

Within the report, it states that: “integrated, person-centered quality care based on best practices will be available across all care settings and people living with dementia will feel welcomed and well-cared for”. In this blog, you have read that we need to create person-centered, relationship-based long-term care homes. This is just one of the ways that we can improve quality care.

Today 90% of residents in long-term care homes have some form of cognitive impairment with over 65% having a diagnosis of dementia. The opportunities for change are now.

The federal election is October 21st, 2019. Attend All-Candidates Meetings in your Riding or write to your local MP candidates, and ask for a fully-funded national dementia strategy.

The Glebe Centre – finally a champion for Ottawa!

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The Glebe Centre, a non-profit, charitable long-term care home, has partnered with Dementia Care Matters to become the first Butterfly Home in Ottawa. The Butterfly Model is a transformative model of care for long-term care homes that means:

  • Total culture change
  • More than addressing the clinical needs of the residents
  • A place where residents, families and staff form a community of care,
  • Relationships matter most and
  • Where residents’ preferences for daily activities are respected

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality.  To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete”.  R. Buckminster Fuller

The Glebe Centre has done just that and seized the opportunity to be the leader for transformative change for our long-term care homes in Ottawa. They will start with one unit in the fall of 2019.  This is a bold and risky step and we offer our hearty congratulations!

Now to get other cities like Brantford, Kingston, Belleville to follow suit.

Better ways to run long-term care homes

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Sherbrooke Village Long-term Care Home, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Below is the letter published in the The Ottawa Citizen in response to the article re “funding cuts jeopardize care homes”.   Read the July 22/19 article here.

“Once again, the vulnerable older adults living in our long-term care homes will be penalized by funding cuts.  Many residents continue to be frustrated and bored, which often results in aggressive incidents.  Staff continue to be exhausted, frustrated and overworked.  Funding cuts aren’t the answer.  Transforming the way care is delivered and creating a new culture of care with innovative models that already exist is a solution.  These innovative models are being used in several communities in the province.

Yes, there is upfront investment but there are projections that the result is cost-neutral.  The result?  Fewer aggressive incidents, decreased medication use, and a decrease in staff sick days.

These models create an atmosphere that is more homelike and provide a sense of community for residents, staff and families.  Wouldn’t you want this kind of transformative care for your family member?

The new Minister of Long-term Care, Merrilee Fullerton, has said that ‘long-term care is a priority for this government.’   CARP Ottawa urges her to include a study of these innovative models of care before making any future decisions regarding cuts.

Rick Baker, President, CARP Ottawa”

If you belong to another branch of CARP or any other organization, please take some action and send letters to your local papers.   We need your help!

Dementia villages!

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The Hogewey Village concept, developed in the Netherlands in the 1990’s, was featured in this blog’s first post (September 22, 2017) describing its implementation at Georgian Bay Retirement Home in Ontario; it has also been implemented in Alberta, and is soon to become a reality as a long-term care home in Langley, B.C.

As reported in The Northern View article on June 20, 2019,  the Langley  complex includes squares, gardens and a park where the residents can safely roam, along with a grocery store, restaurant, bar and theatre streets.

“What we want is to create a space where people can live life to the best of their ability in their own way, ”  For the full article, click here.

Even though the Langley project is private and costly,  it is a model from which both public and private sectors can build on to improve long-term care homes in Canada.  For instance Providence Health Care, a non-profit organization, is now in the process of creating similar purpose-built facilities in Vancouver and Comox.

While change is happening, it is very sporadic in a  system devoid of a strategic plan to overhaul the long-term care home system.

We need a strong advocacy voice to pressure governments at all levels to ‘step up to the plate’ and begin a health revolution in bringing about total culture change in the long-term care home system in Canada.  Please reach out to friends, families, organizations, politicians, and the list goes on to lobby and advocate to make this long overdue change a reality.